Machiavelli in Brussels: The Art of Lobbying the EU

By Rinus Van Schendelen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
THE LIMITS OF EU PUBLIC AFFAIRS MANAGEMENT

From Tantalus to SCARE

Our preceding chapters on the management of EU public affairs are full of buoyant spirits. The attractive flowers and trees of the EU playing field look like being within the reach of every lobby group. Of course, their harvesting is not easy and requires much homework and fieldwork, to be carried out carefully and energetically. But most lobby groups hold the optimistic belief that sooner or later a lot of flowers and fruit can be brought home as trophies and that they can prune, fructify or dig over the soil during their growth at will. Many even see room for planting better varieties. Tantalus, failing to pick the grapes in Hades, would have loved to go to Brussels. The EU decision-making machinery is certainly full of variables, which can be manipulated to get a desired outcome. But EU public affairs management is not without its limits. The mere pressures of time and efficiency make sure that not everything is a variable, let alone an easily manageable one. Not the sky is the limit, but the players, the playing field, the issues, the game, the audiences and all the other circumstances put together.

The various limits can be classed under different headings. One distinction is between the limits that are endogenously linked to a lobby group and those that exogenously come from wherever outside. Another distinction differentiates between structural limits, caused by patterned behaviour, and cultural ones, set by the individual and the collective minds. More concrete is the classification by communication categories or SCARE. The limits in this case come respectively the Sender being the lobby group, the Channels that transmit the messages, the Arena where all information is exchanged, the Receivers being the EU officials and other stakeholders, and the Environment conditioning the other four categories. In this approach all limits of EU public affairs management are viewed from the perspective of the lobby group sending a message. This message can have a substantial

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Machiavelli in Brussels: The Art of Lobbying the EU
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 5249

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.