Scientific Thinking in Speech and Language Therapy

By Carmel Lum | Go to book overview

12

Efficacy of Interventions

Absolute certainty in the face of no data is always a dangerous sign.

—D. McGuiness

The subject of therapy and what it encompasses is a big issue and goes beyond the scope of this book. To situate the material in this chapter, a scenario common in many clinics is presented:

At 2:00 p.m., Mr. Jones arrives at the outpatients area to see his speech clinician. He has been coming for the past 4 months, seeing his clinician once a week. He waits in the sitting area. The door opens, a patient leaves, and Mr. Jones's clinician greets him. The clinician looks quickly though his file to remind herself of what they did a week ago. She decides it would be a good idea to review some of the work they did last week. This will also help set the stage for what should come next in his program. She asks Mr. Jones how he has been and what he has done since they last met. She goes through last week's work and commends him on his effort. "That's not bad," she says. "You did that quite well. Now, maybe we'll try another exercise. This time, I'll demonstrate the movement. Watch me and then you do the same." The patient follows as best he can. "Not bad," says the clinician. "Can you do 10 of those? No, no maybe make it 5," says the clinician. That's great. Now, let's

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Scientific Thinking in Speech and Language Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Scientific Thinking in Speech and Language Therapy *
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables xiii
  • List of Figures xiv
  • A Note to the Reader and the Lecturer xvii
  • Preface xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Science and Pseudoscience 10
  • 3 - Arguments 20
  • 4 - Discovering Knowledge 33
  • 5 - Scientific Description and Explanation 60
  • 6 - Models, Hypotheses, Theories, and Laws 76
  • 7 - The Scientific Method 85
  • 8 - Chance, Probability, and Sampling 94
  • 9 - Describing and Measuring Events 106
  • 10 - Types of Research 120
  • 11 - The Scientific Clinician 136
  • 12 - Efficacy of Interventions 154
  • 13 - A Clinician's Guide: Evaluating the Evaluations 199
  • 14 - The Art and Science of Intervention 224
  • References 237
  • Index 245
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