The Occult Laboratory: Magic, Science, and Second Sight in Late Seventeenth-Century Scotland

By Michael Hunter | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I have incurred many obligations in the course of preparing this book. Its conception grew out of Richard Barber's suggestion that a new edition of Kirk's Secret Common- wealth was needed. A significant amount of the research for it was done in Edinburgh, where I received generous assistance from Tristram Clarke, Richard Ovenden, Charles Withers and, above all, Louise Yeoman. Domhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart has also been tremendously helpful, both in providing comments and references, and in checking the words in Gaelic that appear in the book; in this, he was kindly assisted by Ronald Black and other members of the Celtic Department of the University of Edinburgh. A draft of the Introduction was read by Drs Stiùbhart and Yeoman and Prof. Withers, and by Justin Champion, Mark Goldie, John Henry, Jan Wojcik and Paul Wood; I am grateful to all of them for their comments, though of course I am responsible for any errors or misjudgments that remain. Clare Jackson and Mark Goldie kindly lent me a copy of the text of the edition of Kirk's London Diary that they have in preparation. I have also been helped in different ways by Guy de la Bédoyère, Jeremy Black, Alan Bray, John Buchanan-Brown, Stuart Clark, Antonio Clericuzio, Emmanuele Curti, Roger Emerson, Adam Fox, Carol Gibson-Wood, Robert Harding of Maggs Bros., Frances Harris, Pru Harrison, Rab Houston, Richard Luckett, Elizabeth McGrath, Scott Mandelbrote and Paul Taylor. I have been assisted in my research for the book by Ben Coates, Charles Littleton and Martha Morris.

I am grateful to the various librarians who are custodians of the manuscripts used in this book, who kindly gave me access to the materials which have enabled me to produce the texts presented here. Permission to reproduce the plates from Kirk's student notebook, MS Dc 8 114, has been granted by Edinburgh University Library.

Note: the abbreviation 'BP' has been used throughout to denote the Boyle Papers at the Royal Society.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Occult Laboratory: Magic, Science, and Second Sight in Late Seventeenth-Century Scotland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 247

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.