The Occult Laboratory: Magic, Science, and Second Sight in Late Seventeenth-Century Scotland

By Michael Hunter | Go to book overview

7.
Edward Lhuyd's and Robert Wodrow's questionnaires and the responses of John Fraser and John MacLean
Lhuyd's original questionnaireaPart of the Letter to ‹the Revd› Mr James Fraser
Minister of Kirkhill in the Aird near Invernes: bDated at Falkirk in Sterlingshire Dec. 18 1699.——— But it lies not in their way to be so immediately assisting in the undertaking I am engagd in; in regard, they are strangers to the old Scottish Language & customes, the comparing of which with the Welsh, Cornish, & Armorican is one part of my design. I therefore make bold to addresse my self to you for your kind assistance; & intreat you that besides you'r own trouble, you would prevail with some friend or two (in regard it may prove tedious) to contribute their helping hand. In return I can only promise that if hereafter it may lye in my way to be serviceable to your self or any friend, in my station at Oxford, I shall very faithfully observe your directions, and if I shall understand that any new book there may be acceptable to you, I shall study to expresse my Gratitude. Now the Requests I have chiefly to make (so far as they occur to my thoughts at present) are as follows. /fol. 26v/
1. An interpretation of the Nouns in Mr Ray's Dictionariolum Trilingue; c with the Addition of the Verbs & Adjectives in the vulgar Nomenclatura into the Northern Ersh would be very acceptable. 1
2. A catalogue of the towns, castles, villages, mountains, vales, Lochs & Rivers, within ten (or twenty) miles; 2 with an interpretation of such of these names as are indubitably intelligible; and queries or conjectures about some of the others.
____________________
a
Bodleian Library MS Carte 269, fols. 26—8. For its context, see above, p. 48. Lhuyd's reference to his 'station at Oxford' alludes to his keepership of the Ashmolean Museum.
b
I.e. James Fraser (1634—1709), divine, traveller and writer: Scott, Fasti, vi, 473. See also above, p. 48.
c
I.e. Dictionariolum trilingue (1675), an English—Latin—Greek vocabulary by the naturalist John Ray (1627—1705).

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