The Occult Laboratory: Magic, Science, and Second Sight in Late Seventeenth-Century Scotland

By Michael Hunter | Go to book overview

TEXTUAL NOTES

1. Boyle's interview with Tarbat
1
accidentally repeated.
2
followed by very deleted.
3
followed by now deleted.
4
replacing and deleted.
5
replacing tyme deleted.
6
altered from formere. There is a slight change of ink at the start of this paragraph.
7
followed by in deleted at the start of the next line, evidently because the phrase was originally accidentally left incomplete.
8
followed by some deleted.
9
followed by hands deleted, evidently confirming that the text was dictated.
10
followed by the deleted.
11
altered from affrighted.
12
replacing one of their number deleted.
13
followed by and deleted.
14
altered from indeed. The previous word, not, is lacking from the MS, but has been added to complete the sense, as has the two lines earlier. Four words later, swoone replaces swound deleted.

2. Highland Rites and Customs
1
this is Lhuyd's suggested emendation; the original word (which is not deleted) is things.
2
duplicated by spring.
3
altered from MacKeens [?].
4
replacing bread deleted.
5
followed by THEIR DRINK deleted.
6
followed by broken above the deleted, replaced by sen.
7
replacing Connach deleted.
8
replacing throbus [?] deleted.
9
in square brackets, duplicating ware, which is underdotted.
10
followed by t deleted.
11
followed by persons deleted.
12
altered from Sighgt.
13
followed by [ deleted.
14
altered from somnwhat. Nine words later, at replaces to deleted.
15
replacing apes deleted. There is an asterisk above this and in the margin.
16
altered in composition from Gurt [?].
17
altered from Ceaps.
18
altered from one other [?].
19
altered from Failleart.

-217-

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