American Indian Law Deskbook

By Hardy Myers; Clay Smith | Go to book overview

Foreword to Third Edition

Since publication of the second edition of the American Indian Law Deskbook, the field of Indian law has developed significantly, most notably in the areas of tribal lands acquisitions, tribal gaming, child custody, and contested sovereignty matters. As with the first edition, the Conference of Western Attorneys General (CWAG) has published annual supplements to keep the second edition current; however, the volume and significance of developments in case law, legislation, and regulation make this third edition timely, and perhaps imperative.

As noted in the Forewords to the first and second editions, Indian law has developed as one of the most complex and nuanced of fields, in part because it is the product of a complex history of confrontation, accommodation, and policy reversals. While Indian law arose in the conflicts of Indians and white settlers, it now functions in the context of a multicultural society, dedicated to civil rights and racial equality. The practitioner and scholar in Indian law must deal with criminal law, civil regulatory and adjudicatory law, constitutional law, property law, natural resources law, civil rights law, statutory interpretation, administrative and regulatory law, and similar fields. No single book can instruct completely as to all these areas, but a thorough and continually updated compendium of the law is a needed and powerful resource for Indian law study and practice.

The offices of state attorneys general, with their combined expertise in all areas of Indian law, have been an appropriate—and willing—source of the immense work needed to provide that compendium. As with earlier Deskbook editions, this third edition continues a commitment to neutral and disinterested discourse and analysis.

The changes in this edition include revisions to the organization of many chapters and the substantive analysis in all chapters. Of particular note are the expanded discussion of the trust doctrine in Chapter 1; the significantly revised discussion of the term “Indian” in Chapter 2; the detailed analysis directed to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act in Chapter 3; the analysis in Chapter 4 of the Federal Juvenile Delinquency Act; the exploration in Chapter 5 of the various methods by which Congress

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Indian Law Deskbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 634

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.