Elections in Asia and the Pacific: A Data Handbook: South East Asia, East Asia and the South Pacific - Vol. 2

By Dieter Nohlen; Florian Grotz et al. | Go to book overview

Korea (Democratic People's Republic/ North Korea)

by Mark B. Suh


1 Introduction

1.1 Historical Overview

Since its proclamation in 1948 the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK, hereafter North Korea) has been under communist rule. From the beginning, regular parliamentary elections were held. Yet, non-competitive, their major aim—with an average of 99.9% turnout and a 100% yes-vote—was to provide the totalitarian regime of the 'Great Leader' Kim Il-Sung with an aura of legitimacy. Not even after Kim's death in 1994 and the formal transfer of power to his son Kim Jong-Il in 1998 has there been any move toward political liberalization until today.

The DPRK was established in 1948 in the Soviet Occupation Zone in the northern part of the Korean peninsula. After entering into Korea in August 1945 the Soviet forces had launched a so-called People's Democratic Revolution intending to create a replica of the Stalinist communist system. They installed a young Korean nationalist, Kim Il-Sung, as head of the main executive organ, the Provisional People's Committee. In February 1946, the agrarian sector was reshaped, and the industries and infrastructure were nationalized. In November of that year elections were held to the local and provincial People's Committees. Before, Kim Il-Sung had organized the Democratic National Unity Front, a coalition of various political parties and social organizations intended to fabricate an appearance of political unity among the populace. In truth, however, the United Front was—like in other communist countries—under the strict control of the Korean Workers' Party (KWP). Hence, there were no contesting parties or programs in these elections, in which the turnout was allegedly 99.6% of the registered voters.

The first country-wide election to the national Parliament (Supreme People's Assembly, SPA; Choe Ko In Min Hoe Ui), held in August 1948, was also non-competitive. Purportedly, 98.5 percent of the votes were cast in favor of the candidates selected by the KWP. There were a few other parties, but they existed only for cosmetic purposes and were

-395-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elections in Asia and the Pacific: A Data Handbook: South East Asia, East Asia and the South Pacific - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Elections in Asia and the Pacific i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Notes on Editors and Contributors vii
  • Technical Notes xiii
  • South East Asia 45
  • Brunei 47
  • Cambodia 53
  • Indonesia 83
  • Laos 129
  • Malaysia 143
  • Singapore 239
  • Thailand 261
  • Vietnam 321
  • East Asia 343
  • China (People's Republic) 345
  • Japan 355
  • Korea (Democratic People's Republic/ North Korea) 395
  • Korea (Republic of Korea/ South Korea) 411
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 525
  • The South Pacific 571
  • Australia 573
  • Cook Islands 621
  • Federated States of Micronesia 633
  • Fiji Islands 643
  • Kiribati 673
  • Marshall Islands 687
  • New Zealand 705
  • Palau 741
  • Papua New Guinea 763
  • Samoa 779
  • Solomon Islands 795
  • Tonga 809
  • Tuvalu 823
  • Vanuatu 833
  • Glossary 849
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 858

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.