Rebel Daughters: Women and the French Revolution

By Sara E. Melzer; Leslie W. Rabine | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

To commemorate the Women's March on Versailles in October 1789, we organized a conference on Women and the French Revolution that took place in October 1989 at UCLA. Essays, based on those papers, are now collected in this volume.

Our conference was part of 1787/1989 The French Revolution: A UCLA Bicentennial Program. We wish to thank Robert Maniquis, director of that program, for his support, as well as the University of California, Los Angeles, especially Chancellor Charles E. Young, former Executive Vice-Chancellor William D. Schaefer, and Executive Vice-Chancellor Andrea Rich. Our project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. We would especially like to thank the Florence Gould Foundation, which provided the major support for all our activities.

The initial impetus for the conference came from Karen Rowe, founder and former director of the UCLA Center for the Study of Women. We owe her a special thanks, as well as to the staff of the Center for the Study of Women, which helped organize the entire project from its inception to its completion. Emily Ooms and Marjorie Pearson were the backbone of the sturdy support staff, and Susan Barnes, Van Do-Nguyen, and Carole Collier Frick gave more than generously of their time at crucial stages of the process.

The University of California Humanities Research Institute helped fund the project and provided administrative assistance. We particularly wish to thank its former director, Murray Krieger, and the current director Mark Rose for their support. Julia Van Camp provided crucial administrative aid.

From yet other corners came much appreciated help. The French Consulate, especially Cultural Attaché Alexander Tolstoi, helped us bring distinguished scholars from France. The Los Angeles League of Women Voters helped publicize the conference.

Editing the papers for publication was an essential part of our task. The editorial board deserves a very special mention for their perceptive comments on the essays in this volume. We wish to thank Suzanne Gearhart, Kathryn Norberg, Mark Poster, Karen Rowe, and Domna Stanton.

S. M.

L. R.

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