Postcolonizing the Commonwealth: Studies in Literature and Culture

By Rowland Smith | Go to book overview

14

Cowboy Songs, Indian Speeches
and the Language of Poetry

J. Edward Chamberlin

Cowboys are not particularly popular these days, at least among postcolonial academics. Indians are. In both cases, the reasons are not entirely plausible, though plausibility has never interfered with fashion. So I thought it might be interesting to look a little more closely at cowboys and Indians. They come to most of us through our imaginations, rather than through our experiences. Up until quite recently, Indians were best known from the speeches of their leaders, chiefs like Joseph and Tecumseh and Seattle; and more recently, from the writings of their poets and novelists. With cowboys, it has been their songs that hold us, not so much the current ones about cheating hearts and honky-tonk angels but those nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century songs like "Home on the Range, ” "Red River Valley” and "Goodbye, Old Paint.” One of the first attempts to collect them was also one of the first collections of folk songs in the Americas: John Lomax's 1910 Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads.

The texts of Indian speeches were usually written down at the time they were delivered, and although this process was complicated—and to a considerable degree compromised—by translation and the change from speech to writing, they have become set pieces of poetic power and political rhetoric. They are quoted time and again in defence of

____________________
Notes to chapter 14 are on p. 206.

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Postcolonizing the Commonwealth: Studies in Literature and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.