A Puritan in Babylon: The Story of Calvin Coolidge

By William Allen White | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXIX
Twilight and Evening Bell

A DARK day, with sleet and snow and rain, greeted the Coolidges when they returned to Northampton from Washington. They stepped from the train into a great crowd, which the reporters estimated at six thousand neighbors, gathered to greet their returning heroes. The former President shook hands with his old friends. Mrs. Coolidge greeted them with her accustomed cordiality. The returning townsfolk hurried through the station into their waiting automobile and through the congregation which still lined the sidewalks, standing curiously to see their great neighbors come home. The Coolidges went to their duplex apartment on Massasoit Street. They were two small town Americans, living again in the little house in which they began housekeeping. They were paying thirty-six dollars a month rent for it. The rent was increased from twenty-seven in the husband's gubernatorial term.

As small town Americans they fell quickly into their accustomed places. Mrs. Coolidge resumed her church work at the Edwards Congregational Church. She associated with the Red Cross and with the women's activities of the town. Being a social creature, she enjoyed the intimacies of small town life, the various drives, campaigns, organized community enterprises. But her husband, also in character, kept away from these things. He returned to his law office. To his partner, Ralph Hemenway, he complained1 that he could not walk around town freely. Some strangers would rush up and grab him by the hand and say:

"Mr. Coolidge, I have always wanted to shake your hand!"

Or some such expression. So his favorite pastime of window-shopping

____________________
1
Says Bruce Barton.

-421-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Puritan in Babylon: The Story of Calvin Coolidge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 462

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.