Understanding Colon Cancer

By A. Richard Adrouny | Go to book overview

3

. How Colon Cancer
Develops

Carcinogenesis is the process by which cancer is produced. Carcinogenesis is caused by genetic damage to cells. It is not an infectious process. (Note: certain infectious diseases that are transmissible from person to person may create conditions that permit cancer to develop, but the cancer cells themselves are not infectious.)

Genetic material is contained in the cell nucleus. It consists of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA. DNA is involved in the reproduction of the cell and how it functions (that is, what type of organ it will be part of and what it will do in that organ) and determines most of the attributes of the living organism. The cell is bounded by a membrane, which serves as a site of receptors for hormones and proteins from other cells that may send signals to the cell. The membrane, by virtue of the physical barrier that it creates and the receptor molecules that are located on it, also serves as a gatekeeper that keeps out or permits molecules to enter the cell cytoplasm.

All cancers begin with cells that have accumulated genetic changes, or mutations, which cause the cells to lose normal control of reproduction and differentiation (maturation to their specific individual form and function). These abnormal cells produce progeny that have the same mutations. The majority of colon cancers are the result of either inherited genetic abnormalities that predispose a person to cancer or the accumulation of cancer-producing mutations under the steady influence of environmental stresses. We will be discussing these pathways to cancer in further detail below.

Cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell reproduction and loss of differentiation. Current theory holds that carcinogenesis

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Colon Cancer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Understanding Colon Cancer *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - Who Gets Colon Cancer and Why *
  • 2 - The Colon *
  • 3 - How Colon Cancer Develops *
  • 4 - The [look] of Colon Cancer *
  • 5 - The [feel] of Colon Cancer *
  • 6 - Stages and Prognosis of Colon Cancer *
  • 7 - Surgical Treatment of Colon Cancer *
  • 8 - Treatment of Later Stages of Colon Cancer *
  • 9 - Prevention *
  • 10 - The Future *
  • Appendix *
  • Glossary *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 146

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.