Further reading

Readers interested in deepening their understanding of the subject may wish to consult the following additional literature on global civil society, written at different moments during the twentieth century by specialists in various academic disciplines. The publisher has used its best endeavours to ensure that the URLs for external websites referred to in this book are correct and active at the time of going to press. However, the publisher has no responsibility for the websites and can make no guarantee that a site will remain live or that the content is or will remain appropriate.

For generous and competent research assistance in the preparation of this and other parts of the book, and for the expert preparation of the index, I should like to thank Martyn Oliver.

Jeffrey C. Alexander (ed.), Real Civil Societies. Dilemmas of Institutionalization (London, 1998)

Helmut Anheier et al. (eds.), Global Civil Society 2001 (Oxford, 2001)

Raymond Aron, 'The Dawn of Universal History', in Miriam Conant (ed.), Politics and History. Selected Essays by Raymond Aron (New York and London, 1978)

Roland Axtmann, 'Kulturelle Globalisierung, kollektive Identität und demo- kratischer Nationalstaat', in Leviathan, 23:1(1995), pp. 87—101

Bertrand Badie, L'état importé: L'occidentalisation de l'ordre politique (Paris, 1992)

Gideon Baker, 'The Taming of the Idea of Civil Society', Democratization, 6:3 (Autumn 1999), pp. 1—29

Benjamin Barber, Jihad vs. McWorld: How Globalism and Tribalism are Reshaping the World (New York, 1995)

Gary J. Bass, Stay the Hand of Vengeance. The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals (Princeton and Oxford, 2000)

Ulrich Beck, What is Globalization? (Cambridge, 2000)

John Boli and George N. Thomas (eds.), Constructing World Culture: International Non-Governmental Organizations Since 1875 (Stanford, 1999)

Fernand Braudel, Civilization and Capitalism. 15th—18th Century, vol. 1 (London, 1984)

Hedley Bull and Adam Watson (eds.), The Expansion of International Society (Oxford, 1984)

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Global Civil Society?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Global Civil Society? *
  • Global Civil Society? *
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Unfamiliar Words 1
  • Catalysts 40
  • Cosmocracy 92
  • Paradise on Earth? 129
  • Ethics Beyond Borders 175
  • Further Reading 210
  • Index 214
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