CHAPTER SEVEN

Snapshot of a Private Man

OME PROFESSIONAL athletes glory in fame. They seek opportunities to bring their names before the public. They embrace requests for interviews and public appearances. They pursue media discussion, revel in attention, and need constant adulation. Cy Young was not this sort of athlete. It was not that he was shy, or timid, or arrogant, or ungrateful, or ashamed. Rather, his indifference to acclaim was rooted in his own centeredness: he lived within himself, confident that he knew the difference between right and wrong, satisfied in the company of family and authentic friends, and ready to let the world judge him by his deeds. One cannot say about Cy Young that the private man was an extension of the public persona. Instead, one must conclude that the private man provided the foundation—the undergirding—for the public man.

The central person in Young's life was his wife, Robba Miller Young. 1 Four years younger than her husband, the daughter of Robert and Sue (McAbee) Miller, she had lived in Peoli, Ohio, from birth, but she had spent much of her childhood on an uncle's farm adjacent to the farm in nearby Gilmore owned by McKinzie Young Jr., Cy Young's father. I suspect that Cy and Robba were related, perhaps second cousins, for McKinzie's wife (hence, Cy's mother) had been Nancy Miller before her marriage. Robba and Cy had often played together as children, and since Cy later said that Robba had been his only girlfriend, it is likely that one reason he returned from Nebraska in 1888 was to resume his courtship with her. They were married on November 8, 1892, and made a wedding trip to the East. A photograph taken a year later during a postseason visit to the Chicago World's Fair shows the handsome couple in their early years of marriage. Although a printed description of her calls her a “stylish blonde, ” 2 her few photos suggest that her hair was actually darker

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cy Young: A Baseball Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.