Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: Theoretical Perspectives

By Dale H. Schunk; Barry J. Zimmerman | Go to book overview

students acquire the capability to self-regulate their learning, and these perspectives are described and compared in the chapters that follow.

This book is organized to facilitate comparisons among these theories. First, we asked the authors to plan their chapters according to a common guideline so their chapters would be integrated series of accounts rather than a collection of disparate accounts. This common format gave cohesiveness to the book, making it appropriate as a text for graduate and advanced undergraduate students in such fields as education, psychology, and child and family development. Second, we wanted each chapter to focus not only on theory and research in self-regulated learning but also on instructional practice. Authors were asked to give specific examples of how teachers or parents might apply the theory to youngsters with self-regulation difficulties. Third, we wanted the text to be of value to a broad spectrum of readers. The contributors represent a diversity of theoretical traditions—operant, phenomenological, social cognitive, information processing, volitional, Vygotskian, and constructivist. By presenting such a range of view points, the common features of self-regulated learning approaches emerged clearly and distinctively.

Finally, we wanted a lively book that would be readable by an audience interested in the field of education but without necessarily having a background in self-regulated learning. The contributors were asked to address their chapters to such an audience, and we were delighted in the success they achieved: Not only were the chapters readily understandable and interesting, but they also laid out important new theoretical ground.

In closing, there are many people who deserve credit for making this book possible. First and foremost, we wish to express our gratitude to our contributors. Their conscientiousness and good spirit made our job as editors personally and professionally rewarding. Second, we would like to thank our wives, Diana and Caryl, for their patience and understanding. Finally, we would like to acknowledge our great debt to Albert Bandura, whose pioneering work in the field of self-regulation was our inspiration.


REFERENCES

English, H. B., & English, A. C. (1958). A comprehensive dictionary of psychological and psychoanalytic terms. New York: McKay.

-viii-

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