Unlikely Partners: Philanthropic Foundations and the Labor Movement

By Richard Magat | Go to book overview

11 Economic Development

Foundations and unions have joined together in aid of communities beset by a variety of crises--from race riots to plant closings. For example, the Ford Foundation's most extensive and longest-lasting alliance with the labor movement involved community development corporations (sometimes termed "community unions"), principally in the predominantly black Watts section of Los Angeles and the largely Latino community of East Los Angeles. The Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC) grew out of a study by the Institute of Industrial Relations at the University of California, which was financed under the 1961 Federal Area Redevelopment Act. To implement their study, the academic planners turned to union men with whom they had developed close relationships. The UAW and Teamsters Joint Council 42 helped organize the WLCAC, together with local teenagers. A dozen other unions, from longshoremen to meat cutters, have since joined in. The WLCAC'S activities accelerated after the disastrous six-day riot in Watts in 1967, with emphasis on job training and other skills, housing programs, vest pocket parks, commuter buses, a community newspaper, and a hospital. Through most of its history the organization was run by a former UAW shop steward. Although Ford has been the major foundation supporter ($8.5 million) the WLCAC has also received funds from the Los Angeles city and county governments, the Rockefeller Foundation, and others.

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Unlikely Partners: Philanthropic Foundations and the Labor Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction - An Untold Tale 1
  • 1: Social Order, Social Progress 7
  • 2: Dimensions of Connection and Mistrust 28
  • 3: Congressional Intervention 41
  • 4: Research 52
  • 5: Black Workers 77
  • 6: Working Women 90
  • 7: Farm and Southern Labor 101
  • 8: Education 113
  • 9: Labor Education 126
  • 10: Health, Safety, Environment 136
  • 11: Economic Development 151
  • 12: Public Policy 160
  • 13: Union Democracy 167
  • 14: Organizing 172
  • 15: Prospects 181
  • Conclusion 190
  • Notes 195
  • Index 233
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