Unlikely Partners: Philanthropic Foundations and the Labor Movement

By Richard Magat | Go to book overview

12 Public Policy

Despite self-imposed and external constraints, organized labor and philanthropic foundations have been players in the formation of public policy. Two instances were cited earlier--the deep involvement of the Twentieth Century Fund in the drafting and passage of the National Labor Relations Act ( 1935) and the stimulus provided by foundations to state legislation for Chicago public school reform, despite a reluctant teacher union. One of the most fiercely argued public policy issues in recent years--the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)--also engaged foundations and unions.


Nonalignment vs. Activism

The political history of the American labor movement has been marked by clashes between the concept of collective concerns vs. individual interests. The "pure and simple" business unionism of the early AFL was aimed at the advancement of the individual worker; Gompers cautioned against all but the narrowest involvement in politics, but many lower-rank union leaders rushed to expand their influence in local and state politics. Even Gompers was forced to venture into politics in an attempt to influence Congress to curtail the widespread, destructive use of court injunctions by employers to bar union organizing, and as Republicans grew increasingly antiunion, the AFL not only campaigned vigorously for Woodrow Wilson's reelection in 1916, it then launched its own National Non-Partisan Campaign Commit

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unlikely Partners: Philanthropic Foundations and the Labor Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction - An Untold Tale 1
  • 1: Social Order, Social Progress 7
  • 2: Dimensions of Connection and Mistrust 28
  • 3: Congressional Intervention 41
  • 4: Research 52
  • 5: Black Workers 77
  • 6: Working Women 90
  • 7: Farm and Southern Labor 101
  • 8: Education 113
  • 9: Labor Education 126
  • 10: Health, Safety, Environment 136
  • 11: Economic Development 151
  • 12: Public Policy 160
  • 13: Union Democracy 167
  • 14: Organizing 172
  • 15: Prospects 181
  • Conclusion 190
  • Notes 195
  • Index 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.