Cold War Rhetoric: Strategy, Metaphor, and Ideology

By Robert L. Ivie; Philip Wander et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 1
McCarthy's Image of Communism as Presented on
"See It Now," March 9, 1954
SpeakerExcerpt (Key Vehicles Highlighted)
McCarthy: The raw, harsh, unpleasant fact is that Communism is an issue and will
be an issue in 1954.
Murrow:On one thing the Senator has been consistent. Often operating as a
one-man committee, he has traveled far, interviewed many, terrorized
some, accused civilian and military leaders of the past administration of
a great conspiracy to turn over the country to Communism.... He has
interrogated a varied assortment of what he calls "Fifth Amendment
Communists."
McCarthy:Nothing is more serious than a traitor to this country in the Communist
conspiracy.
McCarthy:And wait 'til you hear the bleeding hearts scream and cry about our
methods of trying to drag the truth from those who know, or should
know, who covered up a Fifth Amendment Communist Major. But
they say, "Oh, it's all right to uncover them but don't get rough doing
it, McCarthy."
McCarthy: Apparently -- apparently, the President and I now agree on the necessity
of getting rid of Communists. We apparently disagree on how we
should handle those who protect Communists. When the shouting and
the tumult dies the American people and the President will realize that
this unprecedented mud slinging against the Committee by the extreme
left wing elements of press and radio was caused solely because another
Fifth Amendment Communist was finally dug out of the dark recesses
and exposed to the public view.
McCarthy:Well, may I say that I was extremely shocked when I heard that
Secretary Stevens told two Army officers that they had to take part in
the cover-up of those who promoted and coddled Communists.

-92-

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