The Avant-Garde in Interwar England: Medieval Modernism and the London Underground

By Michael T. Saler | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The task of writing this page has long filled me with fear— So many people to thank: could all be included here? With a deadline approaching, what if I forgot a name? Or, through the wrong adjective, a friend besmirch and defame?

And then I had the idea, after many cups of coffee, That an Acknowledgements in rhyme could solve this quandary. To be accidently left out would be a blessing, not a curse, If your name were spared inclusion in embarrassing verse. “There, but for the grace of God, would go I, ” such friends should say, Granting me another occasion for their kindness to repay.

At the Stanford “Farm, ” where no one likes to appear an overachiever, Humanistic values still soar in Peter Stansky, Paul Robinson, Paul Seaver. Drive three hours north, to the Central Valley beyond the escarpment, And you'll find a similar grace in the UC-Davis History Department. This book has profited from the advice and critical power Of Norma Landau, Cathy Kudlick, and Dan Brower. (And, while I owe a better sense of cultural history to Karen Halttunen, Finding the right rhyme for her last name has left me feeling done in.) Bill Hagen, Ted Margadant, Susan Mann, and Clarence Walker have been genial hosts, To dinners like those of which the philosophe boasts. My colleagues Michael Smith, Cynthia Brantley, Beverly Bossler, and Kathy Stuart have seen me through Some personal challenges (unfortunately, several more than the proverbial “one or two”).

For the others on my list I will not say, “All errors of this study are mine, the merits belong to they.” (Who ever believes that tired old line anyway?) Instead I'll just acknowledge the generous assistance and know-how Of Martin Jay, Fred Leventhal, R. K. Webb, Dietrich Bertz, and Howard Malchow.

-xi-

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The Avant-Garde in Interwar England: Medieval Modernism and the London Underground
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • 1 - Framing the Picture 3
  • 2 - Frank Pick's City of Dreams, 1878–1915 25
  • 3 - Modernism and the North of England 44
  • 4 - Morris, the Machine, and Modernism, 1915–1934 61
  • 5 - The Earthly Paradise of the London Underground 92
  • 6 - Educating the Consumer 122
  • 7 - The Return of the Bathing Beauties, 1936–1941 148
  • 8 - The Demise of Medieval Modernism 165
  • Note 177
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 235
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