Pregnant with Meaning: Teen Mothers and the Politics of Inclusive Schooling

By Deirdre M. Kelly | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I thank David Beers, Pamela Courtenay-Hall, Jane Gaskell, Sheila Martineau, Paul Orlowski, John Taylor, and Allison Tom for reading and commenting on one or more draft chapters of the book. Dan Hubig magnanimously agreed to supply the cover illustration on short notice.

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada provided a generous grant to support the research on which this book is based. Thanks also to the folks at Peter Lang Publishing (especially Chris Myers) and series co-editor Joseph DeVitis for their interest.

Anita Bonson, Sheila Martineau, Diane Purvey, Kelly Tuffo, and Athena Wang provided excellent research and clerical assistance on the research project. Sheila deserves special recognition. Not only did she serve as my apprentice ethnographer at City School, but she conducted interviews with one third of the teachers at Town School. During the period of intensive fieldwork at City School, Sheila and I exchanged field notes regularly to keep each other informed, share stories, and test interpretations; we met formally at least once a week to compare observations and discuss emerging themes. After the fieldwork, Sheila continued to assist me with data coding and analysis as well as library research. Her contribution to the study has thus been considerable, and I value the friendship that has emerged from our shared experiences, particularly as we navigated the micropolitics of school-based research together.

For helping me to maintain my sanity and sense of humor, especially through the rough patches of writing, my special thanks go to Antoine Altasserre, Maggie Beers, Jane Gaskell, Ricki Goldman-Segall, Nora Kelly, Brenda and Del Lowery, Gaby Minnes Brandes, Bill Richardson, Wallace Robinson, Peter Seixas, and Allison Tom, and to members of my extended Kelly-Beers-Wade family.

I would also like to express my gratitude to the many young people, teachers, administrators, and community workers who generously gave of

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