Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

Preface

We want you to succeed. That is our goal and, it is the goal that each of the authors kept in mind in developing their chapters.


HISTORY OF THIS BOOK

Telling you about the birth of this book will help you benefit from our labor of love. The idea for this book came to the first editor (Steve Walfish) and Gerry Sumprer as they were driving to a party to celebrate the completion of their predoctoral internship: “If we had only known at the beginning of graduate school what we knew at the end of it, life would have gone much more smoothly.” This thought led to a question: Where could students obtain information about the realities of graduate education? Most either “work in the dark” or find out bits and pieces from other students and helpful faculty. Although both are important sources, they are constrained by personal bias and limited experience. Students seeking experts opinions are generally out of luck. Surveys and empirical studies suggest that students are left to their own devices.

Students are not the only ones to face problems. Conscientious faculty members advising undergraduate and graduate students face a conflict. On one hand, they want to provide their advisees with complete and practical information; on the other hand, they are handicapped by numerous and time-consuming demands. Gerry and Steve saw the need for a single source that could provide guidance to bridge the gulf between the type of knowledge needed to succeed in psychology undergraduate programs and that needed to succeed in psychology graduate school and careers. They decided to edit a volume on this topic and assembled excellent chapter authors and submitted the competed manuscript to their publisher.

During the years that followed, Gerry had to withdraw to meet other obligations, and Allen Hess joined the effort to bring the project to fruition, with the help of Larry Erlbaum and Susan Milmoe. The original concepts of the book were updated to make one suitable for the 21st century.

-xi-

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