Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

Beans (1999) suggested that informal mentor relationships are more enjoyable, supportive, and accepted than structured mentoring. The faculty and students need to sift through to find the match that provides “good chemistry.” Those informally mentored find they are visible and have standing in the department, are buffered from adversity, are sponsored for advancement, and earn more money than those formally mentored. However, there are gender differences that show men to benefit from both formal and informal mentoring, whereas women do not gain as much from formal mentoring. In a forced mentoring situation, the student might feel the weight of paternalism, the imposition of one more task and one more task-master, and another burden in a faculty-student (mis)match. Then, too, the mentor might not be ready for the student's progress and transitions and might feel unappreciated for the mentoring efforts. For successful mentoring, these factors need to be taken into consideration in appraising the mentoring relationship.

In a larger sense, the more that faculty and students follow the “do's and don't's” of Tables 8.1 and 8.2, the more each can be successfully involved in the fulfillment of the mid and early adulthood stages, respectively—and the more they can believe in each other, share dreams, and create space for each other to realize their dreams (Clawson, 1980).


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

We thank Joe Buckhalt, Martin Diebold, Sid Hall, Kathryn D. Hess, and Rebecca and Rick Moffett for their comments on earlier drafts of this chapter.


REFERENCES

Atkinson, D. R., Neville, H., & Casas, A. (1991). The mentorship of ethnic minorities in professional psychology. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 22, 336–338.

Beans, B. (1999, November). Proteges want mentors “sympatico, ” not paternal. American Psychological Association Monitor, 30, 35.

Bennis, W., & Shepard, H. (1956). A theory of group development. Human Relations, 9, 415–437.

Blanton, J. S. (1983). Midwifing the dissertation. Teaching of Psychology, 10, 74–77.

Bloom, L., & Bell, P. (1979). Making it in graduate school: Some reflections about the superstars. Teaching of Psychology, 6, 231–232.

Bogat, G. A., & Redner, R. L. (1985). How mentoring affects the professional development of women in psychology. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 16, 851–859.

Carifio, M. S., & Hess, A. K. (1987). Who is the ideal supervisor? Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 18, 244–250.

Celani, D. P. (1976). The acquisition of interpersonal role playing skills as a consequence of the graduate experience in clinical psychology. Clinical Psychologist, 9, 4–5.

Cesa, I. L., & Fraser, S. C. (1989). A method for encouraging the development of good mentor-protégé relationships. Teaching of Psychology, 16, 125–128.

Clawson, J. G. (1980). Mentoring in managerial careers. In C. B. Derr (Ed.), Work, family and the career: New frontiers in theory and research (pp. 144–165). New York: Praeger.

Cronan-Hillix, T., Gensheimer, L. K., Cronan-Hillix, W. A., & Davidson, W. S. (1986). Students' views of mentors in psychology graduate training. Teaching of Psychology, 13, 123–127.

Descutner, C. J., & Thelen, M. H. (1989). Graduate student and faculty perspectives about graduate school. Teaching of Psychology, 16, 58–61.

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