Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview
and fears for both the mentor and mentee. Under these circumstances, both individuals should realize that sensitivity and expert communication skills are essential.
9. Mentors need to help mentees express their personal feelings about their graduate school experiences and their thoughts about becoming a professional. Mentees will need help defining their emerging self and the mentor can assist by listening, confronting, and labeling the mentee's inner battles, doubts, and fears. Helping students with these issues can revitalize mentoring and foster a special kind of intimacy in the relationship.
10. Mentees should realize that the mentor will need to be in control of the learning process at times for growth to be realized. This means that the mentee will need to give up some control and be influenced by the mentor. We recommend that mentors utilize this control humanely and with sensitivity.
11. Mentors and mentees should monitor a number of environmental factors together. Power, control, and competition issues between different faculty members within a department and sometimes between students can destroy environments where mentoring might otherwise flourish.
12. Socialized and negative stereotypes of masculinity and femininity should be monitored. Gender role conflict in mentoring should be identified and discussed constructively. Furthermore, sensitivity to diversity issues should be a high priority for both mentor and mentee.
13. Mentors and mentees should complete research on the mentoring factors, parameters, correlates, and tasks described in this chapter. One study has found empirical evidence for the parameters of mutuality and comprehensiveness in mentoring relationships (Busch, 1985). Much more research is needed, using a variety of research methodologies (Wrightsman, 1981), if we are to understand the complexity of mentoring in psychology training programs.
14. Mentees who have grown because of their mentor's help should personally acknowledge and thank them for their contribution to their life. Likewise, mentors should share their own growth with their past mentees. We need to start dialogues with each other about our mentoring experiences. These kinds of discussions can bring us closer to each other and provide more information about this special relationship. In an age of increased academic competition and guarded collegiality, we believe that mentoring could be an important concept for improving professional training in psychology and the relationships between students and faculty.

REFERENCES

Atkinson, D. R., Neville, H., & Casas, A. (1991). The mentoring of ethnic minorities in professional psychology. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 22, 4, 336–338.

Baugh, S. G., Lankau, M. L., & Scandura, T. A. (1996). An investigation of the effects of protégé gender on responses to mentoring. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 49, 309–323.

Bogat, G. A., & Redner, R. L. (1985). How mentoring affects the professional development of women in psychology. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, 16, 6, 851–859.

Bolton, E. B. (1980). Aconceptual analysis of the mentor relationship in the career development of women. Adult Education, 30, 195–207.

Brown, R. D., & DeCoster, D. A. (1982). Mentoring-Transcript Systems for promoting student growth. New directions for student services, Number 19. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

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