Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

16
Developing Teaching Skills
James H. Korn

Teaching was exactly like sex for me—something you weren't supposed to talk about … but that you were supposed to be able to do properly when the time came.”

—(Jane Tompkins, 1990, p. 654)

Most faculty in my generation had no preparation for teaching when we received our graduate education in the 1960s. Those of us who cared about teaching learned to do it by trial and error, and by watching others, which is about as far as I want to take the metaphor. Unfortunately, the situation today as the century turns is not much different. There are some graduate programs that provide good preparation for a career in college teaching, but many other programs provide only superficial preparation or none at all. The model seems to be that one should sink, swim, or not even go near the water because research or clinical training is what really matters. The variability in the extent and quality of attention given to teaching in graduate programs has been documented in a recent survey (Meyers & Prieto, 2000), which suggests that in many departments students who care about teaching have to train themselves.

This chapter is intended primarily for graduate students and new faculty members for whom teaching will be a major part of their academic career. However, teaching is a generic activity that includes professional workshops and research presentations. Almost all of the ideas and skills that I discuss are part of any teaching activity in some form. My purpose is to provide some initial guidance to those who are searching for ways to help themselves become better teachers. Entire books have been written on specific aspects of teaching, so it is impossible in a few pages to tell you how to do any of these things. The best I can do is to provide some basic suggestions and point you toward sources and experiences that are likely to be helpful.

First, I offer a few words of inspiration and a warning. Teaching is a challenging and rewarding activity. You will be able to touch the lives of many students, and to observe them as

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.