Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

18
Learning Psychoteraphy1
Allen K. Hess

Certain terms are “hyper-real” in the sense that people have a fixed and complex set of associations ranging far from the technical sense of the term. Thus, a person may think that Einstein's theory of relativity said everything is relative, when actually it says, “There are absolute things in the world but you must look deeply for them. The things that first present themselves to your notice are for the most part relative” (Eddington, 1958, p. 23). The term psychologist is hyper-real, or a richly elaborated stereotype. It immediately conjures up a set of associations that we learn quite early in life. For an older generation the image might be based on Montgomery Clift playing Freud, Kubrick's Clockwork Orange, or The Bob Newhart Show. More recently, Frasier, Billy Crystal in Analyze This, Dr. Malfi of The Sopranos, and even the Comedy Channel's Dr. Katz, Therapist, help form the hyper-reality of “the therapist.” These stereotypes guide many to the study of clinical psychology, forming the image against which the student's experiences in graduate school will be measured.

____________________
1
At one time psychotherapy and counseling were distinguished in that the former was intended for personality change, was of longer duration, was intended for more profound life questions of “patients, ” whereas counseling was an outgrowth of the guidance and counseling movement of a half century ago. As such, it was centered on youth and career guidance, and was later extended to career and marital crises of “clients.” These crises were presumed to require short-term intervention, but once intervention began, it became obvious to professionals that the crises were eruptions of longer term problems. The crises may be amenable to short-term help, but change required longer-term psychotherapy. Because the distinctions between the terms counseling and psychotherapy have become blurred, and because the skilled professional in either case needs to know about the human change process, I use the term psychotherapy in the broader, inclusive sense, and use both client and patient and clinical and counseling indistinguishably.

-249-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.