Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

21
Preparing for a Career in Psychology
Outside the University
Raymond S. Nickerson

This chapter focuses on the question of how to use one's school years effectively to prepare for a career in psychology outside of academia. It is addressed primarily to students who are considering a career as something other than a clinical psychologist and in a setting such as industry or government. I limit my remarks to people preparing for a nonclinical career because I have no direct experience in the clinical area. Of course, much of the advice one might give to students who are preparing for a nonacademic, nonclinical career may pertain to those preparing for an academic or clinical career as well; if students in the latter categories find anything useful in the chapter, so much the better, but in making the following comments, I have primarily those in the former category in mind.

What I offer is personal opinion formed, for the most part, by my own experience as a researcher and manager outside the academic world. Perhaps I need to explain “for the most part.” Most of my career as a psychologist was spent with two organizations—7 years with a U.S. Air Force research laboratory (in the Electronic Systems Division at Hanscom Field, Bedford, MA) and 25 years with Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc (BBN, a research and development company in Cambridge, MA). Although this work history pegs me as a nonacademic, I need to confess a feeling of greater affinity with the academic world than it might suggest. During several of the early years at BBN I taught classes at Tufts University and in industrial and government installations as part of my job. Throughout my career, I have participated in many of the activities that are common to academic life—reviewing journal manuscripts, editing books and journals, serving on PhD committees, reviewing grant or contract proposals for research organizations, and publishing research papers. I say this to make the point that, although

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.