Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

22
Preparing and Defending Theses
and Dissertations
Roy P. Martin

Graduate programs in the United States can be thought of as being on a continuum between two idealized models. In the first model, graduate education, particularly doctoral education, has as its primary purpose the training of research skills (Passmore, 1980). This training is designed to prepare scholars, with the university-based researcher/teacher as the prototypic product. In this model, the thesis or dissertation is considered to be the most important single aspect of the student's educational experience. Its successful completion is thought to demonstrate that the student has acquired the skills to function as an independent researcher. Finally, it is supposed to be of sufficient quality to add to the general body of knowledge in the content-area researched (Berelson, 1960).

Although this model of graduate education is dominant in most fields, it has been consistently challenged by critics who say it tends to remove students from the problems of the real world and their solutions. Many have proposed a second model that in its pure form looks much like contemporary medical education. The product of such an educational experience is conceptualized as a field-based professional who applies the basic knowledge of his or her field in an attempt to directly intervene in human problems. This model of graduate education emphasizes applied practitioner skills and knowledge; research training takes a clearly secondary position. In a prototypic program utilizing this model, no thesis or dissertation is required.

From the earliest days of graduate education in the United States there has been tension between these two models of training (Berelson, 1960). This tension is readily apparent in contemporary applied psychology (i.e., clinical, counseling, industrial/organizational, and school psychology) in the distinction between doctor of philosophy (PhD) and doctor of psychology

-303-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.