Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

25
Coping with Licensing, Credentialing,
and Lifelong Learning
Bruce R. Fretz

The information and advice in this chapter are primarily for those readers planning careers as practicing psychologists, as opposed to teachers on researchers. However, because even the latter sometimes wish to engage in part-time practice, they too may find it useful. Psychologists who work in clinics, hospitals, managed care companies, or in their own practices are required to have licenses and/or other professional credentials, which must be renewed throughout their entire careers. These credentials are often, at least initially, based on what has been studied in graduate programs; therefore, even though licensing may seem an issue far in the distant future, students should begin to pay attention to licensing requirements as they begin thinking about choosing a graduate program.

The first section of this chapter focuses on licensing as a psychologist: why it is needed and what kinds of licenses are available, as well as what implications different kinds of licenses have for choices of graduate programs, internships, and first career positions. The second section of this chapter reviews the key requirements for increasingly important additional professional credentials. These credentials have always been valuable for informing the public about the special expertise of psychologists; now they have become almost essential to have if a practicing psychologist wishes to be a paid provider for a managed care company. The last sections of this chapter focus on the importance of, and requirements for, effective continuing professional education. Emerging technology brings new opportunities for making lifelong learning not only a part of professional credentialing but also of value to the effectiveness of your career as a psychologist.

-353-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.