Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

26
Community Intervention: Applying
Psychological Skills in the Real World
Raymond P. Lorion
A. Dirk Hightower

This chapter describes a generic skill that we have come to appreciate increasingly over our careers. The skill complements our clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic techniques as well as our conceptual, methodological, and statistical abilities. In fact, we see the capacity to relate to the world outside of the clinic, the hospital, the campus, and the laboratory as essential for the effective application of these other skills. Many professionals need to acquire that skill on entry into the professional ranks; for some, it needs to be refreshed periodically thereafter. Years of higher education, especially at the graduate level, distance far too many of us from the communities, agencies, services, providers, and residents of settings in which we conduct our clinical and scientific activities. Many of us return to those settings and people with the assumption that our professional responsibility is to do “to them” rather than “with them.” Thus, we have come to view ourselves as different from before and hence from those we serve or study. As careers advance and success is achieved in professional settings, the gap may (re)open or even widen, especially if academic and professional standing and their attributed expertise are not balanced with understanding and empathy for the lives of everyday folks.

Sarason (1985) provided valuable insights into the costs of such off-putting and distancing behavior by professionals. He offered the term professional preciousness to convey the sense that professional knowledge, experience, and perspectives are always superior to those of lay individuals. Effectively, what began as the pursuit of a career in the service of others becomes detached from those whom we seek to serve! This chapter examines that perspective, its implications for clinical and research activities, and ways that this gap may be reduced.

-369-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.