Containing Coexistence: America, Russia, and the "Finnish Solution"

By Jussi M. Hanhimäki | Go to book overview

PROLOGUE
Two Trips to Moscow

The stout old man was tired but happy. He had just returned from his seventh and last trip to Moscow where he had met with the Soviet leaders and signed a treaty that returned the Porkkala naval base, located only a half-hour drive from Helsinki to the southwest, to Finland four decades before the original due date. Granted, the Finns had extended a "friendship" treaty with the Soviet Union for another twenty years, a treaty that required Finland to fight on the side of the Soviets if Finnish soil was used to launch an attack against the Soviet Union, but that seemed so meaningless compared to the fact that within four months-- in late January 1956--Soviet troops would leave Finnish soil, he hoped for good. At the tender age of eighty-five President Juho Kusti Paasikivi had scored his greatest foreign policy victory.

The younger man--athletic, bold, and tall--was equally satisfied. He could remember another trip, seven years earlier, when Paasikivi had sent him to Moscow as a member of the delegation that had negotiated the Finno-Soviet Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance (FCMA), signed in April 1948. At that time the atmosphere had been extremely tense, and most people, both Finns and foreign observers, had expected that the treaty would be a prelude to a communist takeover of Finland. Nobody had celebrated that delegation's return and without President Paasikivi's personal prestige the Finnish parliament, Eduskunta, might never have ratified the FCMA Treaty. In the end, it had turned out to be a safe treaty for Finland, but back in 1948 only a small minority of Finns had believed that the treaty would be enough for the

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Containing Coexistence: America, Russia, and the "Finnish Solution"
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.