Covered Wagon Women: Diaries & Letters from the Western Trails, 1840-1849 - Vol. 1

By Kenneth L. Holmes | Go to book overview

A Letter from the Luckiamute Valley Anna Maria King

INTRODUCTION

The Luckiamute River of Oregon flows into the Willamette from the west not far south of the Monmouth-Independence area where the editor of this set of books has lived for many years. The Luckiamute pronounced LUCKY. ah-mute, with accent on the first syllable) flows through the beautiful Kings Valley,1 named for Nahum King, whose two sons were involved in the life of Anna Maria King, the writer of this choice letter. Although the typed and printed versions were signed both by Stephen and Maria, it is clear from internal evidence that the letter was written by the wife. Her name appears in various other records as Maria, Mariah, and Marie. She seems to have signed it both as Maria and Mariah. She also used two spellings for her first name, Anne and Anna.

The letter is dated 1846, but it tells of the cross-country journey of the pioneers of 1845. The copy we have used was mimeographed by the Works Progress Administration County and Local Historical Records Survey of Oregon sometime during the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In the introduction a field worker tells that it came from a typewritten copy of a newspaper story that had been found in the pocket of Solomon King at the time of his death on March 13, 1913. A notation indicates that Maria was the wife of Solomon King, yet the names signed

____________________
1
The possessive apostrophe is never used in the spelling of "Kings Valley."

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Covered Wagon Women: Diaries & Letters from the Western Trails, 1840-1849 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 282

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.