Forced Labor in the "People's Democracies"

By Richard K. Carlton | Go to book overview

The Cloak of Legality

The essence of the People's Democracies, and their "legal" basis, is the "dictatorship of the proletariat." This dictatorship is exercised in all its phases by the Communist Party, in accordance with the doctrine that the power in the state belongs to the "people," led by the working class, which, in turn, is directed by its vanguard -- the Communist Party. Communist theory denies the general and independent basis of law, adopting instead the "class point of view," according to which law is the expression of the will of the ruling class. It aims to assure the eventual attainment of Socialism, and it seeks to "break the resistance of the exploiters."

It is in this spirit that the People's Democratic regimes have applied the principle that all pre-Communist legal provisions remain in force if they do not conflict with the "achievements of the people's revolution" and are not contrary to the rule of the "people's authorities." Thus, war-emergency decrees and certain repressive laws dating back to the nineteenth century have remained on the statute books, subject to flexible and often ambiguous Communist interpretation. These were supplemented at first by a series of emergency decrees and, more recently, by a series of labor and criminal legal codes patterned after those of the Soviet Union. As the Albanian Minister of Justice stated in presenting the new penal code in 1952:

What are the general principles of the draft of the code? They are the principles of the Soviet Penal Law.... In the crimes against the state complicity has still a larger meaning. In these crimes mere participation in an anti-government group is considered an accomplished crime.... The penalties are intended not only to punish the culprits but to educate them and combat unstable elements.... The principle penalties are: death, imprisonment, deportation for corrective labor, corrective labor and public censure....

The Soviet Union and the People's Democracies deny the existence of slavery or forced labor within their borders, admitting only the maintenance of "corrective" and "re-educational"

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Forced Labor in the "People's Democracies"
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Maps vi
  • Forced Labor in the "People's Democracies" 1
  • The Cloak of Legality 9
  • The "New Course" Amnesties 22
  • The New Slavery 26
  • Problems Concerning the Forced Labor Convention 39
  • Recommendations 48
  • Appendixes 57
  • Forced Labor in Czechoslovakia 111
  • Forced Labor in Romania 141
  • Forced Labor in Bulgaria 179
  • Forced Labor in Poland 207
  • Appendix II - Regulations on "Reform Through Labor Of Criminals" in Communist China 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.