XII FAMILY

WHEN the Chinese National Government severed relations with the Soviets in 1929 the son of Chiang-Kai-Sheck was a student in a Moscow university. On hearing of the break he issued a public statement in which in spite of his Chinese upbringing with its tradition of parental fealty, he said: " Chiang- Kai-Sheck was my friend and father. He still is my father but he is no longer my friend."

In 1928, during the so-called Shakhta trial, in which a group of engineers was tried for sabotage, the son of one of them, a young Communist, printed a statement in the press in which he denounced his father as a traitor and demanded for him the highest measure of social defense, or death by shooting.

Recently, in a village in the Urals, two peasant youths, one aged nine and the other thirteen, denounced their father, who was chairman of the local Soviet, as a friend and abettor of koolacks. The person to whom they made the denunciation was a district official who had come to investigate the man's poor record in office. Subsequently the man was sent off into exile, and his

-220-

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The Great Offensive
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Books by Maurice Hindus *
  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • Part I- For a New Economic Order 11
  • II- Machines 27
  • III- Machines 49
  • IV- Machines 73
  • V- Village 106
  • VI- Village 124
  • VII- Collectives 139
  • Part II- For a New Human Personality 163
  • VIII- Religion 165
  • IX- Religion 182
  • X- Morality 190
  • XI- Prostitution 205
  • XII- Family 220
  • XIII- Schools 236
  • XIV- Art 259
  • XV- The Army 279
  • XVI- Jails 293
  • XVII- Man 312
  • Part III- For New Adventures 329
  • XVIII- Siberia 331
  • XIX- Revolution 349
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