XIII SCHOOLS

THERE was a dignity and luster about the old Russian gymnasium--high school--which made it a place of distinction in any community. I recall the one in the town in which as a boy I attended school. It was one of the very few fine buildings in the community --a three-story brick structure with large windows and many of them, and always freshly painted and clean inside and outside. Class-rooms and offices were decorated with portraits of the Czar and Czarina mounted in gilded frames and with pictures of noted men of letters and scientists, both Russian and foreign, and reproductions of famous paintings likewise mounted in fitting frames.

The teachers accentuated in manner and appearance the dignity and formality of the institution. There was nothing slouchy or negligent about them. They looked and acted important, and they were important--mingling in the best society and treated everywhere with deference. Like soldiers and officials they wore handsome uniforms of blue or black cloth with golden epaulets and with a double row of gilded buttons. If

-236-

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The Great Offensive
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Books by Maurice Hindus *
  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • Part I- For a New Economic Order 11
  • II- Machines 27
  • III- Machines 49
  • IV- Machines 73
  • V- Village 106
  • VI- Village 124
  • VII- Collectives 139
  • Part II- For a New Human Personality 163
  • VIII- Religion 165
  • IX- Religion 182
  • X- Morality 190
  • XI- Prostitution 205
  • XII- Family 220
  • XIII- Schools 236
  • XIV- Art 259
  • XV- The Army 279
  • XVI- Jails 293
  • XVII- Man 312
  • Part III- For New Adventures 329
  • XVIII- Siberia 331
  • XIX- Revolution 349
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