XIV ART

GORKY'S new play, Yegor Bulitchev, has excited Moscow as no literary event since the Revolution; and in it there is a scene which gives insight into the kind of mentality that a Soviet artist has to reckon with if he wants to have his work appreciated or even accepted.

The hero of this play, a merchant in the pre-revolutionary days, is on the point of death. He is a cynic and an infidel; but his wife and her sister, being profoundly religious, cannot bear the thought of his dying without receiving the last sacrament, and so they send for a priest. Followed by the wife and her sister and several other members of the family with lighted candles in their hands, the priest and the deacon, garbed in gorgeous vestments and swinging incense and intoning solemnly, "Hospodi Pomilui" ("Lord, have mercy"), proceed to the dying man's chamber.

It is a moving scene, and in the old days a Russian audience would have been stirred to tears. The incense, the candles, the chanting, would have aroused in it a sense of awe of death and life. But on the evening when

-259-

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The Great Offensive
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Books by Maurice Hindus *
  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • Part I- For a New Economic Order 11
  • II- Machines 27
  • III- Machines 49
  • IV- Machines 73
  • V- Village 106
  • VI- Village 124
  • VII- Collectives 139
  • Part II- For a New Human Personality 163
  • VIII- Religion 165
  • IX- Religion 182
  • X- Morality 190
  • XI- Prostitution 205
  • XII- Family 220
  • XIII- Schools 236
  • XIV- Art 259
  • XV- The Army 279
  • XVI- Jails 293
  • XVII- Man 312
  • Part III- For New Adventures 329
  • XVIII- Siberia 331
  • XIX- Revolution 349
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