The Democratic Machine, 1850-1854

By Roy Franklin Nichols | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGENT

THE author has received much help and many favors during the period of his research. Officials of many public and semi-public libraries have extended much-needed and much- appreciated cooperation. Especially to Mr. John C. Fitz patrick of the Division of Manuscripts of the Library of Congress does the author wish to acknowledge his indebtedness. For the space of six months and more the writer spent most of his time in the Manuscript Division and as a result he desires to be one of the many who in growing numbers give testimony of their appreciation of Mr. Fitz patrick's knowledge of the manuscript sources and his willingness to bear all sorts of importunities from historical students.

Mrs. George H. Dana of Burkehaven, New Hampshire and Mrs. Andrew Marshall of Boston generously placed at the author's disposal invaluable historical material which has been of great use in the preparation of this study.

Miss Mary A. Reilly has taken great pains to transcribe the rather involved manuscript for submission and printing and has consequently sawed the author much worry and labor.

Professor John Hubbard Logan of Rutgers College was largely responsible for the author's interest in personalities and politics and has read this study in manuscript.

There are three men, however, to whom the author feels especially in debt. This study was undertaken under the guidance of the late Professor William Archibald Dunning and during the early stages of the enterprise, sometimes dis-

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