Intersections: Fantasy and Science Fiction

By George E. Slusser; Eric S. Rabkin | Go to book overview

Biographical Notes
BRIAN ATTEBERY teaches American literature at Idaho State University. He is the author of The Fantasy Tradition in American Literature.
J. TIMOTHY BAGWELL teaches humanities and German at Vanderbilt University and writes on semiotics and aesthetic theory.
DAVID CLAYTON has taught at the University of California, San Diego, and at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His specialty is literary theory. He is at work on a book on science fiction and modern fantastic literature.
MICHAEL CLIFTON is in the English Department at Fresno State University and is working on a study of the imagery of visionary states in literature.
MICHAEL R. COLLINGS teaches in the Humanities/Fine Arts Division of Pepperdine University and writes widely on modern fantasy and science fiction.
SAMUEL R. DELANY is the author of the essay collection Starboard Wine. His most recent fiction is The Bridge of Last Desire.
MICHAEL HOLQUIST is Professor of Comparative Literature at Yale University and a noted authority on Soviet literature and criticism.
KATHRYN HUME is Professor of English at Pennsylvania State University and is the author of Fantasy and Mimesis. She has just published a book on Pynchon.
DAVID A. LEIBY is completing his doctorate in English at the University of California, Los Angeles, with a dissertation on time travel literature.
MICHAEL MCCLINTOCK is Professor of English at the University of Montana and has written widely of science fiction.
FRANK MCCONNELL is Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and is well known in the field of film criticism. He is also the author of several mystery novels.
JOSEPH D. MILLER teaches in the Department of Animal Physiology at the University of California, Davis, and works for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

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