The Democratic Machine, 1850-1854

By Roy Franklin Nichols | Go to book overview

INDEX

A
Allen, William, 199
Angel, B. F., 145n
Appleton, John, 77
Armstrong, Robt. J., 34-6, 151-2
Atchison, D. R., 26, 31, 35, 102-3, 178, 192
Atherton, Charles G., 81, 120, 123, 162, 165, 169, 177, 180, 200
Augusta Age, 82
Austin, A. W, 163, 215

B
Baltimore Sun, 75, 126, 130
Bancroft, George, 147 n.
Barbour, John S., 75, 123, 140-2, 144, 180
Barnburners, origin, 21; nominate ticket in 1844, 22, and Cass, 43-52, 92, 95; and Marcy, 43-52; and Dickinson, 43-52; in New York City, 44-5; and Butler, 86; and hardshells, 92, 95-106; and revolt of 1853, 205-15.
Barnes, Isaac O., 81, 145
Barrett, Editor of Harrisburg Keystone. 61, 73
Barstow, Benj. H., 216
Beardsley, Samuel, 46, 103-4, 179
Bedinger, Henry, 194
Beckman, Dr., 162
Belmont, August, 54, 66-68, 157, 162, 195
Bennett, James G., 104, 210
Benton, Thomas A., Jackson's choice as Van Buren's successor, 15, 79; war on states' rights Democrats in Mo., 26; friend of Woodbury, 56; hostility to Buchanan, 36; defeated for re-election to Senate 1851, 79; desired by friends 239] to run for pres. 1852, 88; refused, 80; suggests Woodbury, 80-81; opposed to Houston, 83; and Butler, 84-91; suggests M. Blair for cabinet, 180
Berret, James G., 100, 102, 103
Bigler, William, 63
Birdsall, Ausbrun M., 46, 102- 104, 138, 162
Bissell, William H., 195
Blair, Francis P., Sr., opposition to Ritchie, 32; friend of Woodbury, 56, 79-81; correspondence with Buchanan, 1849, 56; relations with Jackson, 79; plplans for 1852, 79-91; and Houston, 83-4, 91; and Butler, 84-91; and Douglas, 116-7; writes campaign documents, 158; advice on cabinet choice, 174, 180
Blair, Montgomery, 180
Blattenberger, George, 66
Bocock, T. S., 68, 74
Borland, Solon, 193n, 197
Boston Post, 149
Boston Times, 212
Boutwell, Geo. W., 126
Bowdoin College, 123
Boyd, Linn, 40, 90-1, 102
Bradbury, James W., 31, 70, 123
Bradford, S. D., 163, 215
Brady, James T., 44
Breckenridge, John C., and Butler, 86; defends and kills Butler, 90, 115-6
Bright, Jesse D., 30, 35, 86, 120, 132, 143, 152, 180, 192, 199
Brodhead, J. R., 212
Brodhead, Richard, 61, 63, 73, 102, 192
Bronson, Greene C., 193, 202-3, 208-212
Brown, Aaron V., 124, 135239

-239-

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