Irreverence: A Strategy for Therapists' Survival

By Gianfranco Cecchin; Gerry Lane et al. | Go to book overview

EDITORS' FOREWORD

T he process of creating this book began when the three authors sat down to share their thinking about some of their more difficult cases. They discovered they had similar views, their discussion was fruitful, and they agreed to carry on the conversation the next time their paths crossed. They met several more times, and found their shared ideas began to coalesce around a concept they called "irreverence". However, these clinicians do not work together, they do not belong to the same research project, and they are separated by thousands of miles. Instead they were joined by a similar openness to new ideas, and they were able to influence and be influenced by each other in such a way that this innovative thinking has become clarified for all to understand and put to use. As editors we have been delighted to be part of this process and to be able to bring this book to the reader.

This book is not a rationale for collecting different techniques for use in difficult situations. Rather, it is an affirmation that systemic therapists must always be on the edge, open to new ways of seeing things and new ways of intervening; they must always be prepared to say, "Yes, but there is another way

-vii-

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Irreverence: A Strategy for Therapists' Survival
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editors' Foreword vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Chapter Two - Irreverence and Violence 13
  • Chapter Three - Irreverence in Institutions: Survival 31
  • Chapter Four Suggestions for Training 49
  • Chapter Five - Some Considerations for Research 63
  • Chapter Six - Random Closing Meditations 73
  • References and Bibliography 77
  • Index 80
  • About the Authors 82
  • Irreverence: A Strategy for Therapists' Survival *
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