José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation

By John M. Kirk | Go to book overview

4. Political System

Having outlined the origins of Martí's political career and the principal influences on the development of his thought, the type of society that José Martí aspired to introduce into an independent Cuba can be examined in greater detail. Any attempt to outline the basic political structure desired by Martí for Cuba is facilitated by eliminating at the outset those aspects of government that Martí's views definitely, and most obviously, forbade. Although this may be somewhat self-evident, it must be stated that Martí wanted an essentially republican form of government for his patria. Having already experienced first-hand the injustice of an oppressive monarchy in Cuba, he was determined that this form of government should never again be instituted on the island.

His campaign to liberate Cuba was therefore based on a very clear understanding that a monarchial government was unjust as well as archaic and would not be tolerated in Cuba. His thoughts on the subject were exemplified by an article published in the Caracas newspaper La Opinión Nacional on September 17, 1881. Léon Gambetta had recently been elected Prime Minister of France, and Martí was clearly overjoyed with the results. "This is the conquest by modern man: to be the hand and not the flour being pounded; to be the horseman and not the steed; to be one's own king and priest; to govern oneself" ( XIV, 58).1 France was indeed fortunate, Martí emphasized, "because this people does not have a king, it is indeed a kingly people" ( XIV, 58). In short, as he wrote in 1877, "the prime duty of people at this time, is to be people of their time" ( VII, 97).

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface ix
  • I- Historical Analysis Of Martí Studies 1
  • 1- from Místico To Revolutionary 3
  • II- the Molding Of a Visionary It 19
  • 2- Origins of A Political Career 21
  • 3. Evolution of Sociopolitical Thought 41
  • Iii. the Envisioned Patria 63
  • 4. Political System 65
  • 5. Moral Foundation 86
  • 6. Social Structure 106
  • 7. Economic Policies 132
  • Conclusion 153
  • Chronology 157
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 181
  • Index 199
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 201

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.