José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation

By John M. Kirk | Go to book overview

6. Social Structure

Because José Martí was killed before he was able to effect his reform program, an analysis of Martí's social reform must be based on his stated intentions rather than his actions. Had he survived the war against the Spanish forces, undoubtedly he would have fought tirelessly to institute sweeping social changes in the patria Indeed, a study of Martí's exemplary selfless life, when compared with the strength of his convictions, reveals quite dramatically that he did in fact practice what he preached, thus affirming a commonly cited claim that José Martí was "el hombre más puro de la raza" ("the purest man of the race")1

Focusing on the type of society and social structure that Martí aspired to establish in a liberated Cuba, there are four basic and clearly defined social innovations that he supported wholeheartedly and would have attempted to introduce in Cuba after independence had been won. (It is noteworthy that these programs present the logical conclusion of Martí's desire for a moral basis of the patria because their successful application was dependent largely on a national determination to implement such previously unheard-of reforms.) First, Martí was determined to eliminate all racial inequality in an independent Cuba. Second, he was equally convinced that a meaningful form of social equality should be introduced, thus reducing the glaring inequalities and hence the grave social tensions that he had observed in North America. The third broad plank of Martí's social reform program was to strip the highly influential Catholic Church of all earthly power on the

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José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface ix
  • I- Historical Analysis Of Martí Studies 1
  • 1- from Místico To Revolutionary 3
  • II- the Molding Of a Visionary It 19
  • 2- Origins of A Political Career 21
  • 3. Evolution of Sociopolitical Thought 41
  • Iii. the Envisioned Patria 63
  • 4. Political System 65
  • 5. Moral Foundation 86
  • 6. Social Structure 106
  • 7. Economic Policies 132
  • Conclusion 153
  • Chronology 157
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 181
  • Index 199
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