José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation

By John M. Kirk | Go to book overview

Notes

PREFACE
1. Hence the claim by Carlos Alberto Montaner: "For us Cubans, everything can be debated, everything can be divided into opposing views, except the figure of Martí. This complete and absolute subordination to Martí is explained by the phenomenon already outlined: to deny the validity of Martí is tantamount to renouncing an ingredient -- possibly the most basic one -- of the Cuban identity." El pensamiento de Martí ( Madrid: Plaza Mayor Ediciones, 1971), p. 3.
2. All quotations from Martí Obras Completas are from the edition published in Havana by the Editorial Nacional de Cuba, between 1963 and 1966. The numbers of both the volume and page are indicated in the text by Roman and Arabic numerals respectively.
3. Juan Marinello, "El caso literario de José Martí", Once ensayos martianos ( La Habana: Comisión Nacional Cubana de la UNESCO, 1964), p. 74.

CHAPTER 1
1. Montaner, p. 4. This introductory chapter is based on a recent paper, "From Apóstol to Revolutionary: The Changing Image of José Martí," read at the annual conference of the British Society for Latin American Studies in April, 1977. Expanded versions of this paper have since appeared in Norte/Sur and the Latin American Research Review.
2. Andrés Valdespino, "Imagen de Martí en las letras cubanas", Revista Cubana 1 (July-Dec. 1968):307.
3. Salvador García Agüero, "Secuencias Martianas", Revista Bimestre Cubana 37 ( 1936):207.

-163-

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José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface ix
  • I- Historical Analysis Of Martí Studies 1
  • 1- from Místico To Revolutionary 3
  • II- the Molding Of a Visionary It 19
  • 2- Origins of A Political Career 21
  • 3. Evolution of Sociopolitical Thought 41
  • Iii. the Envisioned Patria 63
  • 4. Political System 65
  • 5. Moral Foundation 86
  • 6. Social Structure 106
  • 7. Economic Policies 132
  • Conclusion 153
  • Chronology 157
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 181
  • Index 199
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