CHAPTER VI
CONCLUSION

THE need for co-operation between King and Commons grew more urgent in proportion as the Commons' ascendancy in parliament made them more equally matched. The need was present before 1660, and the reigns of the later Stuarts only emphasized the inadequacy of the solution offered both by the legislation of the Long Parliament in 1641, and by the Restoration settlement, which made no advance on it. The legislation of 1641 was supplemented in the years after 1689. By 1716 the King could not, without infringing statute law, legislate outside parliament or set aside Acts of Parliament, and he could not, without parliamentary sanction, supplement his ordinary revenue by taxation or maintain a standing army. Moreover, the King's fundamental prerogative in relation to the House of Commons, the summoning and dissolving of parliament, had been to some extent curtailed by statute, while the coming of regular annual sessions, in the wake of financial needs, had made the Commons almost as continuous a part of the constitution as the King. On the other hand, the King retained his extra-parliamentary position as head and sole constitutor of the executive government, and this position even seemed to be fortified by the coming of regular parliaments, with a life distinct from that of the King's ministers. Thus, by 1716, legislation, combined with the failure of the Commons to control the King's choice of ministers, had provided a legal framework for the relations between King and Commons.

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
King and Commons, 1660-1832
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.