APPENDIX G
INFRINGEMENT OF THE SEPTENNIAL CONVENTION

Extract from the Annual Register, 1806, p. 262.

( Grenville's administration, formed after Pitt's death in January 1806, advised and obtained the dissolution of parliament in October. The new parliament met in December and was in its turn dissolved, on the advice of Grenville's successor Portland, in April 1807. The two dissolutions were criticized on the same grounds: that, unless a special emergency existed, a new administration was not justified in seeking to strengthen itself by asking for a new parliament.)

The only measure of the new ministry, that falls under our notice in the course of the present year, is the dissolution of parliament, on which we confess that we cannot bestow our commendation. Even the advocates of this whig administration, we apprehend, must admit, that in this measure they sacrificed to temporary expediency the permanent interests of the constitution. The crown has unquestionably the right of dissolving parliament. But from the composition of that assembly, the exercise of this right tends infallibly to increase the influence of ministers in the house of commons, and, therefore, were it ever to become the usual practice of our government, for those in office to dissolve parliaments, when not constituted to their liking, those assemblies, influenced by the terrors of a premature dissolution, which is always inconvenient and expensive to their members, would lose all spirit of liberty or resistance, and become the tame and servile instruments of court. If septennial parliaments are found to be of too long duration, it would be better at once to revive the Triennial Act, than palliate the evil by a remedy, which, every time it is repeated, adds to the influence of the crown over the representatives of the people. We are not ignorant that particular situations and emergencies call for this exertion of the prerogative; but we know of no sufficient reason to justify the advice to exercise it on the present occasion. There was no difference of opinion between the two houses of parliament. Peace, it is true, had not been obtained; but the causes, that had led to a rupture of the negotiation, were unknown to the public, when parliament was dissolved; and judging from

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
King and Commons, 1660-1832
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.