Konrad Adenauer: A German Politician and Statesman in a Period of War, Revolution, and Reconstruction - Vol. 1

By Hans-Peter Schwarz | Go to book overview

eral Chancellor's office and bringing administrative order to the Ministry for Economic Affairs.

However, most of the CDU state secretaries were experienced administrators rather than mere party bureaucrats. Many of them had valuable experience in the ministries to which they were appointed. Although Walter Strauss, who had been a member of the Parliamentary Council, was first and foremost a politician, even he had spent some time in the judiciary; after several clashes with Dehler, Strauss eventually came to terms with his role as a servant of the state.

Adenauer's interest was not restricted to the most senior posts. To his great irritation, many of the important positions at the senior civil-service level in the Frankfurt administration had been occupied by Social Democrats. This was one of the reasons behind his reluctance to transfer the Frankfurt administration to the federal ministries; he regarded the Frankfurt administrators as both ineffective and too left wing. A cabinet commission strongly influenced by the Ministry of the Interior was appointed to produce guidelines for the future development of organisation and personnel. The ministers agreed that all appointments and promotions from Ministerialrat upwards, as well as all first-time appointments from Oberregierungsrat upwards, should be approved by the cabinet at the suggestion of the minister concerned. This would give the Federal Chancellor's office the opportunity to influence a wide range of appointments. Large numbers of senior Frankfurt civil servants who belonged to the SPD were ruthlessly weeded out, and CDU members or sympathisers placed in many important positions.

Most of Adenauer's attention was devoted to the key ministries. The Federal Chancellor's office worked to place additional, politically 'reliable' civil servants in ministries which were under the control of members of his own party of whom Adenauer did not approve, such as Heinemann and Storch. Adenauer also managed to put trusted civil servants in the ERP (European Recovery Program) Ministry under Vice- Chancellor Blücher, which administered U.S. economic assistance and the Marshall Plan. His protracted disputes with Blücher over this issue caused the first strains in relations between the two men.

These developments were directed, in close association with Adenauer, mainly by Ministerialdirektor Hans Globke. By the time he was finally promoted state secretary on the formation of a new government in 1953 Globke had managed to shape many of the ministries according to his master's will. In fact, Globke was one of the key figures in Adenauer's chancellorship, and his role reflected the basic personal and political convictions by which Adenauer operated. Ever since the winter of 1949/50, Adenauer and Blankenhorn had discussed the principles and personnel on which the new federal government would be based. In the Frankfurt central authorities, it had been a matter of principle not to employ any former

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Konrad Adenauer: A German Politician and Statesman in a Period of War, Revolution, and Reconstruction - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Prologue: Cologne 3
  • I - The Young Master Adenauer 1876-1906 33
  • Student Years In Freiburg, Munich and Bonn 59
  • Justitia Coloniensis 64
  • 'A Talent Takes Shape in Stillness' 69
  • II - The First Rapid Rise 1906-1917 83
  • The First World War 93
  • The Youngest Mayor in Prussia 105
  • III - The Mayor 1917-1933 113
  • The Rhineland Movement 1918-1919 133
  • Pater Familias 152
  • Modern Cologne 156
  • Political Recognition at National Level 164
  • 1923 -- Year of Crisis 172
  • 'the Mayors of Contemporary Germany Are the Kings of Today' 195
  • In the Maelstrom Of the World Economic Crisis 210
  • IV - In the Third Reich 1933-1945 229
  • Struggle for Survival 241
  • A Pensioner in Rh"Ndorf 269
  • 'It is a Miracle of God That I Have Survived' 281
  • V - The Party Leader 1945-1949 289
  • Dismissal by the Liberators 321
  • 'Adenauer's Seizure of Power' 329
  • The Party Leader 359
  • Towards the Federal Republic of Germany 382
  • The President of the Parliamentary Council 408
  • Setting the Course 421
  • VI - First Years as Chancellor 1949-1950 433
  • The Political Tableau During Bonn's Early Days 450
  • Adenauer's Political Machine 465
  • Strenuous Beginnings of Westpolitik 476
  • 'the Most Disappointed Man in Europe' 489
  • The Schuman Plan 504
  • 'that Bully Adenauer' 517
  • In the Depths of Unpopularity 555
  • Adenauer's Daily Life 570
  • VII - European Statesman 1950-1952 587
  • Europe 608
  • Western Treaties and Soviet Initiatives 628
  • 'the Wings of World History' 642
  • Warding off the Moscow Note Offensive 650
  • The Breakthrough: The Signing of the Western Treaties 665
  • Afterword 689
  • Notes 703
  • Archival Sources 735
  • Pictorial Sources 737
  • Published Sources and Select Bibliography 739
  • Index of Persons 747
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