Monarchy and Incest in Renaissance England: Literature, Culture, Kinship, and Kingship

By Bruce Thomas Boehrer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS WORK HAS DEVELOPED over a far greater period of time, and through many more drafts and canceled pages, than its present length might suggest. That is my own fault, and it is doubly great given the variety and distinction of the help I have received while writing.

Of the many people who have worked with me, I owe the greatest debt to two: to Maureen Quilligan, without whom I never could have started this project; and to David Lee Miller, without whom I never could have finished it. The remaining small army of readers I must acknowledge, and thank as best I can, in chronological order. The group includes Robert Y. Turner, Margreta de Grazia, Clark Hulse, Stephen Orgel, Arthur Kinney, and Constance Jordan; but a number of anonymous readers have also contributed to the manuscript in sometimes massive ways. They know who they are, and I thank them, too. In addition, I am especially grateful to my editors, Jerry Singerman and Mindy Brown, who have dispensed a lifetime's worth of counsel and hand-holding on this single project and this single author.

Others have assisted me as well, in a variety of ways. Elizabeth Beck with helped me with my Latin. The Folger Shakespeare Library provided a short-term grant that enabled me to complete my research; I owe much to the help of Nati Krivatsky in particular, and the Folgcr staff in general. Arthur Searle helped me with manuscript research at the British Museum. My home institution, Florida State University, gave me a summer grant that enabled me to proceed with my rewriting. Studies in English Literature, Renaissance and Reformation, and Milton Studies published early versions of my work on Ford, Tyndale, and Milton respectively, and while that work is so different from the present study that I am reprinting nothing, I am grateful to these journals for giving me a forum in which to develop my ideas. My wife, family, friends, colleagues, and students put up with me.

This work was written in memory of my father; but I also want to acknowledge my deep debt to Philip J. Gallagher, my friend and teacher, who died suddenly and tragically in 1987.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Monarchy and Incest in Renaissance England: Literature, Culture, Kinship, and Kingship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • I- Henry VIII and the Political Uses Of Incest Theory 19
  • 2. Incest and Tudor Literary Politics 42
  • 3- James I and the Fabrication Of Kinship 86
  • 4. the End of Kingship? 113
  • 5- Conclusions: the Politics of Incest Theory 138
  • Afterword 157
  • Notes 159
  • Bibliography 173
  • Index 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.