No Sorrow like Our Sorrow: Northern Protestant Ministers and the Assassination of Lincoln

By David B. Chesebrough | Go to book overview

Appendix

"S OUTHERN CHIVALRY, and What the Nation Ought To Do With It," was delivered by Alonzo Hall Quint on Sunday afternoon, April 16, at the North Congregational Church of New Bedford, Massachusetts, where Quint served as pastor. Quint preached a morning sermon that was basically a eulogy of Lincoln, which meant that he prepared two discourses on very short notice. The reason for choosing the sermon on "Southern Chivalry" is that it may well be the most vitriolic post-assassination sermon from a Northern pulpit in its attitude toward and prescriptions for the South.

Quint was a pastor who was actively involved in the public affairs of his day. At the same time he held a pastorate during the Civil War, he also served as chaplain of the 2d Massachusetts infantry from 1861 to 1864. He served on the Massachusetts Board of Education from 1855 until 1861 and was a member of the state legislature from 1881 to 1883. Quint had an avid interest in history and was a member of several historical and genealogical societies. He was the author of several publications, including The Potomac and the Rapidan, or Army Notes From the Failure at Winchester to the Re-enforcement of Rosecrans ( 1864), The Records of the Second Massachusetts Infantry, 1861- 1865 ( 1867), and First Parish in Dover, New Hampshire ( 1883).

Quint's sermon in this appendix is an attack upon Southern character, which he calls "Southern Chivalry." The "Southern Gentleman," Quint asserted, had long been regarded as "the perfection of humanity." It took a long time to discover that such a perception was a "delusion." Southern chivalry, in fact, was characterized by "slavery," "barbarism," "robbing," "stealing," "perjury," "murder," "rebellion," and "treason." Quint summarized Southern chivalry by saying that "Their customs, their laws, their practices,

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No Sorrow like Our Sorrow: Northern Protestant Ministers and the Assassination of Lincoln
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - A Nation Grieves 1
  • 2 - The Character of Abraham Lincoln 16
  • 3 - Responsibility for the Assassination 41
  • 4 - The Demand for Justice 53
  • 5 - The Assassination As an Act of Providence 66
  • 6 - Sermon Conclusions 79
  • Conclusion 90
  • Appendix 112
  • Notes 139
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 196
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