Reforming the Workplace: A Study of Self-Regulation in Occupational Safety

By Joseph V. Rees | Go to book overview

key feature was a job site labor-management safety committee (consisting of two representatives each from labor and management) that assumed many of OSHA's regulatory responsibilities, such as conducting inspections and investigating complaints. Meanwhile, CAL/OSHA stopped routine compliance inspections and assumed a "monitoring" role. The seven job sites participating in the CCP were large construction projects, ranging in cost from $36 million to over $2.4 billion. They employed from 250 to 4500 workers on each site, all of whom belonged to construction unions. The types of project included one nuclear power plant, three fossil fuel processing plants, two buildings for "high tech" research, and one thirty story condominium.

A striking feature about the CCP was that at each project all the major parties to the agreement -- labor, management and CAL/ OSHA -- could withdraw from the program at any time and for any reason by invoking an escape clause. No one withdrew. Indeed, no one threatened to withdraw because, according to leading participants, the program "worked." A measure of just how well the program worked is its impact on project accident rates. As Table 1-1 indicates, accident rates at CCP projects were significantly lower than accident rates for comparable projects in California, and also lower than those for comparable company projects. Project A's accident rates are especially revealing. The CCP began after construction was already well underway on Project A; about 40 percent of the project -- 19.5 million man hours -- was completed under OSHA's traditional regulatory enforcement system (CAL/OSHA inspected Project A fourteen times in the eighteen months prior to the CCP). On the other hand, about 60 percent of the project -- 29 million man hours -- was built after the CCP's start. Before the CCP Project A's accident rate was 7.2 (lost work day cases per 100 workers); after the CCP began it was 4.3 -- a 40 percent drop. There is no doubt, according to participants, that a significant part of that drop can be traced to the CCP.1

What are the reasons for the CCP's success? The answer to this question is complex. It is worth pursuing, however, first of all, because the public policy literature is filled with case studies documenting "implementation failures," while the implementation "success story" is the rare exception. More important, though, this inquiry focuses our attention on some key aspects of the regulatory process

-2-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reforming the Workplace: A Study of Self-Regulation in Occupational Safety
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Politics of Regulatory Reform 22
  • 3 - The Law and Enterprise Responsibility 55
  • 4 - Professionalism and Accountability 85
  • 5 - The Labor-Management Safety Committee 134
  • 6 - Flexible Regulatory Enforcement 175
  • 7 - Conclusion 224
  • Appendix: Research Methods 241
  • Index 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.