Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

MULTIPLY ENFORCEMENT SUCCESSES
Judge Ewing Cockrell Circuit Court, Missouri President U. S. Federation of Justice
1. The Eighteenth Amendment is effective--to an extent.

Notwithstanding its failures, its successes have been many, its blessings are great.

The problem essentially is to make it more effective-- to multiply these successes and extend these blessings.

The plan here submitted is to utilize all the actual achieved successes of the 18th Amendment. It presents concrete means, of extending the definite methods and practices by which all these successes have been won.

2. Eighteenth Amendment effectiveness consists of two halves: (1) obedience--getting everybody possible to obey it; (2) enforcement--punishment of those disobeying it.

This plan covers both halves.

3. Eighteenth Amendment enforcement is literally nobody's business. It is the business of many independent bodies.

The violator of the Amendment fights nineteen soldiers o[the law. If he whips any one of these nineteen, he wins the whole battle. These nineteen are (1) police; (2) prosecutor; (3) trial judge; (4) authority selecting the jury panel; (5 to 16) twelve jurors, any one of whom may block a verdict; (17) appellate court; (18) jailor; (19) pardoning authority.


Slippery Bootleggers

If the police don't catch a bootlegger, all the other officials are helpless to convict him. If the jailor does not hold him, the efforts of all the others have been futile.

Hence effective enforcement comes only from all these

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 578

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.