Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

CO-ORDINATE AND MOBILIZE
Richard J. Hopkins Associate Justice, Supreme Court Topeka, KansasTO make the 18th Amendment effective in the United States the following steps are required:
1. A detailed survey showing conditions of law violation and enforcement throughout the nation.
2. A federal Department of Prohibition, the head directly responsible to the President.
3. Co-ordination of all the powers of federal and state governments, working in unison.
4. Effective laws.
5. Capable officials in favor of the law.
6. Education of officials, so that they understand fully their duties, and of the people so that they will co-operate with the officials in law enforcement.
7. Eternal vigilance on the part of officials and the people.

A public spirited citizen has propounded the question: "What is the best and most practicable plan to make the 18th Amendment effective"? John Sherman once electrified the nation by the simple statement that "the way to resume is to resume". His suggestion may properly be paraphrased here by stating that "the way to make the 18th Amendment effective is to enforce the law".

Ever since the ratification of the 18th Amendment its enemies have persisted in a demand for a national referendum, maintaining that its passage and ratification were secured by a minority. The referendum has now been held. The nation in no uncertain terms has again taken its stand in favor of the Amendment. Having done so, has it the power and determination to make the Amendment fully effective, and if so, how?

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