Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

RE-ENFORCE ENFORCEMENT

John R. Keister District Attorney, Greensburg, Pennsylvania

THE plan herein respectfully submitted, to make the 18th Amendment to the Constitution more effective, is epitomized in the next following paragraph, and then, in the remainder of this paper, given elucidation.

Two postulates are first presented, and a conclusion is drawn therefrom. First: No war or national conflict, especially a major civil conflict within and waged by a democracy, can be won in this day and age, without the support of the general public opinion of the citizens of the belligerent government. Second: The governmental authorities of a belligerent nation are ar all times after the declaration of a war, charged with the duties of estimating public opinion and developing the morale of its citizens, and the burden of those duties cannot be shifted to extra-governmental agencies. Conclusion: Therefore, in the present peace-time but acute civil conflict, wherein our government opposes its declared public enemy, the liquor evil, continued enforcement must be re-enforced by enabling laws providing for the immediate mass drafting and training by the government of the reserves of public opinion: this by (a) a thoroughly extensive, persistent and intensive campaign of propaganda and popular education along prohibition lines, and (b) a combatting of contra-treasonable propaganda promulgated by the enemy and his conspiring allies.

Objection is raised that only the crank, the radical, the bigot, regards the liquor issue equivalent to a war of the first magnitude. Turn, however, to the pages of history and regard the unequivocal attitude of Abraham Lincoln. Prior to the Civil War, he alluded to the abolition of liquor

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